Tag Archives: writing tips

Insomniacs Anonymous 10-22-18

NaNoWriMo is right around the corner. Are you planning to participate this year? If so, how are you prepping for the intensive upcoming month? If this isn’t your first time trying to write a novel in November, what tips would you share for those newbies attempting it for the first time?

Practical Prompt 10-8-18

If you’re struggling to keep your story on track during a first draft or a revision, take a moment to write down the one thing–the feel, or theme or idea–that most inspired you to write that particular story in the first place.  That’s the heart of your story. It’s the thing you most want people to carry away with them after they finish reading your story and the plumb line in every scene.  By putting it into words, you’ll have a clearer idea of what choices your characters will need to make and what actions they’ll need to take in each scene to remain true to the heart of your story.

Practical Prompt: 9-26-18

The more writers can put themselves into the shoes of the people populating their stories, the more authentic the characters will be to the reader. This week, try writing  a scene from a POV other than your protagonist’s. Even if  your novel is going to be single POV, the exercise will deepen your understanding of the supporting cast in your story, which will translate into more rounded and believable characters on the page.

 

Practical Prompt 9-10-18

When you attend a writing conference, workshop or book fair pay attention to how the established authors talk about their books. Note how they engage the audience. Do they tell you the story, how they wrote the story or a combination of both? Does the tone of their presentations match the genres of their novels? How do they project their voices and  use body language to draw the audience in? Then, apply what you learned and decide how to best connect to your audience.

On Writing About Another Culture

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

When I started writing stories as a kid, I remember wanting to write about things beyond my imagination and understanding. I was of course, like most young girls growing up in the 80s and 90s, very much smitten with the wondrously  daydreamy Anne Shirley. But like Anne, there came a time when I found myself with writer’s block. The practical advice she was given was also parroted by my own mother: write what I know.  It’s a nice sentiment. Continue reading