Learn to Write by Reading: 8/31/16

WriteOwls logo 150 blackIn our Learn to Write by Reading Challenges, we have challenged you to read more and to read outside your comfort zone to learn how successful authors craft their stories. But sometimes you need clear instructions. With that in mind, this month we’re recommending books, blogs and podcasts that we have found helpful in developing our writing craft.

Books
Story Genius by Lisa Cron. Follow up to her book, Wired for Story, Story Genius takes the brain science from Cron’s first book and gives you a blueprint using those concepts to create your own novel.
Book Riot, Children’s Bookshelf
Outlining Your Novel by K.M. Weiland, Structuring Your Novel by K. M. Weiland

Podcast
Diymfa.com by Gabriela Pereira

Blogs
Writer’s Digest
The Writers’ Alley

Next week, we’ll go back to our regular Learn to Write by Reading based Practical Prompts. But in the meantime, we’ll be looking for more great writing references to share.

Learn to Write by Reading: 8/24/16

WriteOwls logo 150 blackIn our Learn to Write by Reading Challenges, we have challenged you to read more and to read outside your comfort zone to learn how successful authors craft their stories. But sometimes you need clear instructions. With that in mind, this month we’re recommending books, blogs and podcasts that we have found helpful in developing our writing craft.

Books

The The Art of Fiction by John Gardner
On Writing by Stephen King
The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi

Podcast

Story Grid
Library Police

Blog

Writers in the Storm
bryndonovan.com (Of particular value are a series of master lists: of facial expressions, physical descriptions, and gestures and body language.)

Each week this month, we’re listing a few more of these wonderful resources.

Writing Doesn’t Have to Be Lonely

Megan Norris Jones

Megan Norris Jones

Last August, I attended a new book festival hosted in my hometown. The daylong schedule was slam-packed with fantastic author panels on all kinds of topics, including an outstanding one on children’s literature. An opportunity to hear from so many authors gathered fifteen minutes from my house—for free!—was a dream come true, so as soon as I got home that night, I marked the date for this year’s festival on my calendar.

So, Saturday morning, I headed downtown to talk to book people about books. The authors were insightful and engaging, and I went to sessions for picture books, middle grade and young adult, in addition to several panels on adult literature. But one of the best parts of going to a local festival was discovering people I thought I knew in the sessions with me. Not only did I find people who loved books, but I discovered other people who created books, both writers and illustrators. Continue reading

Learn to Write by Reading 8-17-16

WriteOwls logo 150 blackIn our Learn to Write by Reading Challenges, we have challenged you to read more and to read outside your comfort zone to learn how successful authors craft their stories. But sometimes you need clear instructions. With that in mind, this month we’re recommending books, blogs and podcasts that we have found helpful in developing our writing craft.

Books

The War of Art, by Steven Pressfield. A Sun-Tzu styled treatise on engaging any creative discipline and conquering the resistance within.

Podcast
Story Grid

Blog

Pub Rants

Each week this month, we’ll list a few more of these wonderful resources.

You Remember My Good Friend, Harry

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

When my daughter found out that a new book in the Harry Potter franchise was being published this summer, she insisted we pre-order it so she could start reading it the day of its release. I explained to her that the book wouldn’t be like the original series she devoured in elementary school. “It’s a play,” I said. “The ‘book’ is the play’s script. It’s not going to read like the other stories.” But that didn’t matter to my 11-year-old. All she cared about was the fact that she was going to get to read more about her beloved Harry, even if he was now an adult and the dad of one of the play’s main characters. So we placed our Amazon order and counted the days until the book’s arrival on our doorstep. Continue reading