Tag Archives: writing tips

Practical Prompt 5-13-19

This week, choose a book that has a similar feel to the story you’re working on. Read a page or two before you start writing to set the tone for the session.

A Head Clearing Ritual

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

I’m a morning person, always have been, so my day begins around 5am, Monday-Friday. Perhaps you are the same, perhaps not. But getting up early didn’t necessarily mean that I was ready to hunker down and work on my book.

In fact, it took me an embarrassingly long time to sort out what I needed to ready myself to write, but once I did, I found that having a pre-writing ritual, one that begins before I go to bed, has helped me prepare, physically and mentally, to focus on my work. Continue reading

Write By Midnight Pep Talk 3-29-19

Stacey Kite

I wanted to give everyone an update on my Write by Midnight experience since I was head down writing like a fiend at the end of February.

This year’s challenge was great for me! I met my goals. I wrote every day, honed my routine and came up with a way of using note cards to spot scenes that didn’t move the story forward—especially after plot tweaks. I wanted to share this  plotting/revising technique with you as our first post-WBM pep talk of the year. Continue reading

Practical Prompt 3-11-19

If a scene isn’t coming together, try using a bulleted list to help you work through it. Include character action, introspection and motivation, as well as interactions with other characters or your setting. Focus on creating a step-by-step list of how one thing leads to the next. Don’t worry about writing complete sentences at this stage of the process. The goal here is to figure out the sequence of events and how your character reacts to or is affected by those events. Once you have a solid list of things to highlight in the scene, work through those bullet points by turning them into prose.

Focus Your Writing Through Focused Research

Laura Ayo

I once dropped a watermelon out of a second story window in the name of research. With my husband armed with a video camera and two preschoolers hopping with excitement from the sidelines, I let it plummet to the driveway below. I wanted to see how far the pink flesh would scatter after it hit the pavement. I wanted to hear the splat, watch the rind split open and analyze the juice spray pattern from the impact. I sacrificed a perfectly good watermelon for the sake of gathering sensory details that would lend authenticity to a story I was writing at the time. It ranks in the top five of the most fun I’ve had while doing research. Continue reading