Tag Archives: writing tips

Revising at a Sloth’s Pace to Discover Joy in the Details

Laura Ayo

I’m no stranger to revision. During my years as a daily newspaper reporter, I edited and revised on deadline. Every day. Often, for multiple articles, each written in a matter of minutes, not hours, and certainly not days. Even as a freelance journalist, I regularly revise and edit articles, press releases, web content, blogs, social media posts and whatever else a client might send my way. But revising a middle grade historical fiction novel is nothing like I’ve ever experienced before. This past week, I’ve been really taking the words of poet and novelist Vikram Seth to heart:

“Revision has its own peculiar pleasures and its own peculiar frustrations. The ground rules are already established; the characters already exist. You don’t have to bring the characters to life, but you do have to make them more convincing.”

In the spirit of Seth’s words and to mark the start of the second week of Write by Midnight, I thought I would share some of the pleasures and frustrations I felt while striving to make my characters more convincing.

First, the frustrations.

Revision. Takes. For. Ever.

My Write by Midnight goal was to revise two chapters a week. And even though I wrote more than my planned 90 minutes on five days and met my time limit on the other two days, I only revised one chapter and barely made a dent in the second. Last night, as I prepared to write this progress report, I reflected on why, even with more dedicated writing time, I struggled to reach my goal. There are many answers, but I can sum them up by saying I want to write with historical accuracy and emotional authenticity in a way that middle grade readers want to keep turning the pages.

This. Takes. Time.

When I wrote the first draft, I didn’t worry about researching how people in the 18th century would have treated pneumonia. I made notes to go back during revision to discover what the hold of an 18th century sloop would look like and how the crew would repair storm damage to the ship at sea. I just wrote past those – and many other – period-specific details during the drafting stage.

But now I’m revising and I need those details. They’re vital for my readers to feel the fear, worry and helplessness that my protagonist experiences as she’s trying to care for her sick mother during a storm in the hold of an 18th century ship that is carrying them away from their homeland to an unknown destination. Finding those details takes time. Paring them down to the ones that evoke the emotions I want the reader to experience takes time. Making sure they’re the sights, sounds and smells an 8-year-old girl would notice takes time. Discovering the words she would use to describe her thoughts and feelings takes time. Making sure all of these details are age appropriate, readable and interesting takes time.

Revision is the stage of writing where writers need to invest the time.

Doing so leads to the pleasures Seth referenced. My research unearthed the details I needed to not only add layered depth to my characters, but also illustrate the themes I want to get across in my writing. The discovery process is thrilling, especially when it leads to writing you never thought yourself capable of. So, I’m not beating myself up for not writing two chapters by the end of the first week of Write by Midnight. The words I did get on the page are good ones. They say what I want them to say. My story is better because of the time I invested.

As I move onto the second week of our write-a-thon, I’ll keep letting the peculiar pleasures outweigh the peculiar frustrations. I’ll move forward with my revision process, slow and detailed as it may be, and wish you all the best in discovering what works best for you and the stories you strive to tell.

How writers benefit from reading aloud

Today is #WorldReadAloudDay, so take time to read aloud what you’ve written so far for the Write by Midnight challenge. It’s best to have someone read your work back to you. The experience is invaluable because it allows you to hear repetitiveness or wordiness, judge the pacing and figure out where the reader stumbles. If you’re uncomfortable with that, record your voice and play it back to yourself or upload your manuscript to an app or program that will read it aloud to you. If you’re brave enough to read to someone, you have the added benefit of observing where they’re confused or if they stop to ask questions. However you choose to celebrate #WorldReadAloudDay, share with us how the experience helped you as a writer.

Write by Midnight Pep Talk 1-25-21

It’s hard to believe 2021 marks our 5th year of hosting the Write by Midnight daily writing challenge. This year’s write-a-thon starts a week from today! For those of you new to our blog, we challenge ourselves and our readers to commit to writing every day – by midnight – in the month of February. Are you up to the task? Spend this week preparing so you’re ready to hit the ground writing on Feb. 1. Links to past blog posts, writing prompts, tips, a goal-tracking log and inspiration can be found on our Write by Midnight page. 2020 wasn’t the year we expected it to be, but now that we’ve adapted, let Write by Midnight be the springboard you need to get back into the habit of writing every day.

Write by Midnight Pep Talk 10-26-20

At the beginning of the COVID-19 lockdown, the WriteOwls agreed to write at the same time during the week so that we didn’t feel so isolated. We kept one another motivated and accountable by texting at the beginning and end of each session. We were surprised how productive we were during that time. So this month, we recommend you try a similar strategy. After you come up with your writing schedule for November, find a partner or group to help you stay accountable. Share your schedules so that each person knows when the other is supposed to be writing. Then, message each other with a reminder that it’s time to get to work. After the writing session is over, let each other know how you did. If you’re really ambitious, agree to exchange your work at the end of each week. Let us know if this strategy helped you meet your writing goals for the month.

Practical Prompt 10-19-20

Consider using imagery to convey the tone of a scene. It’s fine to select a universal image, such as fluffy white clouds or birds chirping to set a happy mood. But you can elevate the scene by picking an image that connects in a specific way to your story or reinforces one of your character’s traits. Then, examine how you can use that same image to depict a change in tone by the ending. For example, if that happy scene ends on a sad note, transform those fluffy white clouds into dark thunderclouds, or have those chirping birds fall silent. Using thoughtful imagery not only reinforces the emotional impact you want your story to have, but also broadens your reader’s experience of the world you’ve created.