Tag Archives: writing resources

Two Days Until Write by Midnight

WriteOwls logo 150 black

The kickoff for Write by Midnight is only two days away, and some great resources to help you on your journey to success are writing logs and project trackers.

Click here for a printable log designed specifically by the WriteOwls for next month’s challenge.  Or, search for the terms “word count tracker” or “writing progress meter” online for some tech-oriented options. There are a variety of apps available, as well, for writing on the go. Try a few tools until you find the one that works best for you.

If you opt for the WriteOwls printable log, record the time of day you wrote (8 p.m. to 8:52 p.m.), where you wrote (desk, carpool line, coffee shop), your goal for that day (300 words, revise a scene, finish outline), your progress toward that goal (wrote 208 words, revised one sentence of a scene, outlined chapter one), and any notes about what did or didn’t work during the writing session.

By using this worksheet, you’ll hopefully see how well you’re incorporating writing into your daily routine, as well as patterns of productivity. You might be surprised how much you get written in the carpool lane or how little you get done at 10 p.m.—or vice versa. Experimenting with writing times and locations can help you discover how writing fits most naturally and effectively into your life.

Go ahead and download the form now, and write out your goal for Feb. 1. Then, at the end of your writing session the first day, assess where you are in your project and set a goal for Feb. 2.

When you complete the Write by Midnight challenge with a regular and sustainable writing schedule, not only will the month of February have been a success, but you’ll be ready to maintain that success into March, April, May and onward.

Ew, Argh, Eek!

Stacey Kite

Stacey Kite

Looking up the spelling for interjections and exclamations, those sounds people make that aren’t really words, takes me far more time than it should. It’s strange that, though I recognize expressions like ew, pee-ew and pfffffffffft in stories and cartoons and know what they mean, I have a horrible time remembering how to spell them. Since my spell-checker usually doesn’t know, either, I wind up wasting precious time looking up the spelling on the net. Or worst case, have to spend time fixing a drawing or painting where I misspelled some hand lettered sound-effect.

Writer-Style Twitter

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

The WriteOwls encourage you to customize your Twitter feed to support a healthy writing life by following:

  • Authors you admire
  • Writers in your writing or critique group
  • Agents you’re considering sending your work to
  • Publishing houses and their imprints
  • Professional associations and organizations for writers, particularly those within your favorite genres and those in your region or town
  • Writing publications and literary journals
  • People who know books, such as librarians, independent book sellers, book stores in your town and book reviewers
  • Writing coaches, university writing departments and style guides

Who else do you follow on Twitter, and what have you learning about your craft by following them?

Learn to Write by Reading: 8/24/16

WriteOwls logo 150 blackIn our Learn to Write by Reading Challenges, we have challenged you to read more and to read outside your comfort zone to learn how successful authors craft their stories. But sometimes you need clear instructions. With that in mind, this month we’re recommending books, blogs and podcasts that we have found helpful in developing our writing craft.

Books

The The Art of Fiction by John Gardner
On Writing by Stephen King
The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi

Podcast

Story Grid
Library Police

Blog

Writers in the Storm
bryndonovan.com (Of particular value are a series of master lists: of facial expressions, physical descriptions, and gestures and body language.)

Each week this month, we’re listing a few more of these wonderful resources.

Learn to Write by Reading 8-17-16

WriteOwls logo 150 blackIn our Learn to Write by Reading Challenges, we have challenged you to read more and to read outside your comfort zone to learn how successful authors craft their stories. But sometimes you need clear instructions. With that in mind, this month we’re recommending books, blogs and podcasts that we have found helpful in developing our writing craft.

Books

The War of Art, by Steven Pressfield. A Sun-Tzu styled treatise on engaging any creative discipline and conquering the resistance within.

Podcast
Story Grid

Blog

Pub Rants

Each week this month, we’ll list a few more of these wonderful resources.