Tag Archives: writing resources

Ew, Argh, Eek!

Stacey Kite

Stacey Kite

Looking up the spelling for interjections and exclamations, those sounds people make that aren’t really words, takes me far more time than it should. It’s strange that, though I recognize expressions like ew, pee-ew and pfffffffffft in stories and cartoons and know what they mean, I have a horrible time remembering how to spell them. Since my spell-checker usually doesn’t know, either, I wind up wasting precious time looking up the spelling on the net. Or worst case, have to spend time fixing a drawing or painting where I misspelled some hand lettered sound-effect.

Writer-Style Twitter

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

The WriteOwls encourage you to customize your Twitter feed to support a healthy writing life by following:

  • Authors you admire
  • Writers in your writing or critique group
  • Agents you’re considering sending your work to
  • Publishing houses and their imprints
  • Professional associations and organizations for writers, particularly those within your favorite genres and those in your region or town
  • Writing publications and literary journals
  • People who know books, such as librarians, independent book sellers, book stores in your town and book reviewers
  • Writing coaches, university writing departments and style guides

Who else do you follow on Twitter, and what have you learning about your craft by following them?

Learn to Write by Reading: 8/24/16

WriteOwls logo 150 blackIn our Learn to Write by Reading Challenges, we have challenged you to read more and to read outside your comfort zone to learn how successful authors craft their stories. But sometimes you need clear instructions. With that in mind, this month we’re recommending books, blogs and podcasts that we have found helpful in developing our writing craft.

Books

The The Art of Fiction by John Gardner
On Writing by Stephen King
The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi

Podcast

Story Grid
Library Police

Blog

Writers in the Storm
bryndonovan.com (Of particular value are a series of master lists: of facial expressions, physical descriptions, and gestures and body language.)

Each week this month, we’re listing a few more of these wonderful resources.

Learn to Write by Reading 8-17-16

WriteOwls logo 150 blackIn our Learn to Write by Reading Challenges, we have challenged you to read more and to read outside your comfort zone to learn how successful authors craft their stories. But sometimes you need clear instructions. With that in mind, this month we’re recommending books, blogs and podcasts that we have found helpful in developing our writing craft.

Books

The War of Art, by Steven Pressfield. A Sun-Tzu styled treatise on engaging any creative discipline and conquering the resistance within.

Podcast
Story Grid

Blog

Pub Rants

Each week this month, we’ll list a few more of these wonderful resources.

Learning the Lingo

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

If you’re a swimmer, you know you swim fly, back, breast and free in that order in the IM. If you know nothing about swimming, you are likely feeling like a foreigner in a country where everyone but you speaks the same language. It’s an uncomfortable, frustrating position to be in. Yet, every hobby and sport has its own lingo, just as every profession, including writing, does. I was reminded of this fact last week while talking with some writer friends. I used the acronym WIP during our conversation and one of the women interrupted me to ask what it meant. “Work in progress,” another answered. Since then, I’ve been thinking about how much there is to learn when it comes to writing terminology. Continue reading