Tag Archives: writing life

Write By Midnight Pep Talk 11-26-2018

The WriteOwls are getting excited for the 2019 Write By Midnight challenge in February. We’d love to hear from you about what you’d like to see from us this year. What tools, tips and resources would help you best in your quest to keep writing every day?

Write Now, Research Later

Laura Ayo

I’m five days into one of the biggest personal challenges I’ve ever taken on as a writer. Like thousands of other writers across the globe this month, I’m attempting to write a 50,000-word manuscript in 30 days during National Novel Writing Month. To hit the target, I need to write 1,667 words a day. I’ve either met or come close to that goal all but one day. On Nov. 2, I only wrote about 400 words. I’d love to say that life got in the way that day. I had work to do, children to mother and other responsibilities that needed my attention. But the reality of the matter is I spent four hours working on my novel that day. So, what happened to result in such a low output? I got sucked down the research rabbit hole. Continue reading

Insomniacs Anonymous 10-22-18

NaNoWriMo is right around the corner. Are you planning to participate this year? If so, how are you prepping for the intensive upcoming month? If this isn’t your first time trying to write a novel in November, what tips would you share for those newbies attempting it for the first time?

Write by Midnight Pep Talk 8-27-18

Interacting with other writers is a great way to stay energized about your own work. This month, find a way to engage with the writing community. Seek out a writer’s conference or book festival to attend. Libraries, book stores and universities host author lectures and book signings that you can check out, as well.

If you’re like us, being around the writers who attend these types of events will motivate you to go home and make your stories the best they can be.  In our experience, fellow writers are usually more than happy to socialize and network. So don’t plan to just listen while you’re there. Talk to those around you. Ask them about their projects. Share what you’re working on. You’re likely to find people who can offer solutions to some of the struggles you’ve faced. And you’re likely to walk away feeling more confident about your own projects.

 

Finishing a Novel One Step at a Time

Laura Ayo

I had the privilege of meeting Newbery winner Linda Sue Park when she visited my daughter’s school last month. In preparation for her visit, I re-read “A Long Walk to Water.” The novel is based on the true story of Salva Dut, one of thousands of Sudanese “Lost Boys” who were separated from their families during the country’s civil war in 1985 and traveled on foot for hundreds of desolate miles to reach a refugee camp in Ethiopia. In the story, Salva’s uncle motivates his nephew to keep putting one foot in front of the other by breaking up the daunting trek into smaller, manageable parts. Continue reading