Tag Archives: writer’s life

When to Stay the Course and When to Move On

Megan Norris Jones

We’ve all been there. That moment when a new story takes shape, and your mind is alive with all the possibilities of creation. It’s brilliant, so shiny and bright, and you just have to start writing it now. Because, honestly, that story you’ve been slogging through for a couple of years now is looking pretty tired. It’s probably not The One, so it’ll be best all around if you dig into the new story right away.

Maybe yes, maybe no. I’ve made both choices: abandon a manuscript that just doesn’t have what it takes or stay the course till it’s finished. An idea that hasn’t been written down yet will almost always look better in your imagination than the reality of clumsy words on the page that never quite tell the amazing story that lives in your head. Sometimes it’s best to cut your losses and move on to something more promising, but if you don’t learn to finish what you’ve started, you’ll never actually write a book. 

So how do you decide which to do? Here are some points of consideration that have helped me.

1. Is the underlying idea of your story strong enough to carry an entire book?

Sometimes I have an idea that seems really great, but when I sit down to write it, that great idea isn’t really strong enough to undergird an entire novel. The first manuscript I wrote was like that. I wrote a draft, polished it up a bit, and took it to my first writers’ conference. Once there, it was a terrible shock to discover that my little novel was terribly thin. The idea simply wasn’t interesting enough to keep anyone reading. If I were to ever have any hope of publishing it, the spit shine I’d given my first draft wouldn’t do. It required a complete overhaul, down to its premise. I could have kept the characters and story world I’d created, but that was about it. I discovered that I wasn’t so attached to those characters to make the work worthwhile. I let it go. Continue reading

A Head Clearing Ritual

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

I’m a morning person, always have been, so my day begins around 5am, Monday-Friday. Perhaps you are the same, perhaps not. But getting up early didn’t necessarily mean that I was ready to hunker down and work on my book.

In fact, it took me an embarrassingly long time to sort out what I needed to ready myself to write, but once I did, I found that having a pre-writing ritual, one that begins before I go to bed, has helped me prepare, physically and mentally, to focus on my work. Continue reading

Embracing Simplicity: The Environment

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

If you read my previous post, you know that I am sloshing through the muddy fields of learning to live a slow, more simplified life.  I define the event as muddy because it hasn’t always been easy; it’s a whole lifestyle change and like anyone, I’m a creature of habit. But none the less, a creature with an endgame: a finished and polished novel and the dream of an agent to submit it to. Continue reading

Train Your Brain

Megan Norris Jones

I used to be an A+, top-of-the-class, nothing-less-than-perfect-will-do student. I could study like a machine, get it done, and move on to the next thing. But I’ve realized something lately. I don’t study any more. I’ve graduated from school; there are no tests, and if I want to know something, I just look it up. So my razor-sharp concentration skills that I was so proud of? Yeah, they’ve gotten a little fuzzy, and it’s starting to affect my writing.

There are plenty of contributing factors. I have three children who ask me a question or need something from me approximately every ninety seconds. Ninety seconds is not a long time to develop concentration. And if they don’t need me after ninety seconds has passed? I remember something I’ve been meaning to look up on my phone. Or I check email. Or Twitter (follow me @mnj23!). Or I’m already plugged into a podcast. And then a kid asks a question again. I am essentially training my brain to be distracted. And if I’m distracted when I’m trying to write, my productivity plummets. Continue reading

Embracing Simplicity: How learning to slow down has aided my writing

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

I’ll keep this short and sweet. Minimal. (At least I’ll attempt to be. It’s a complicated subject.)

Since the last Write By Midnight, I have slowly been embracing what it means to live a slow, simple and minimalist lifestyle. I mean to truly live it for my own personal health (be it physical or mental), for the sake of my family and for the sake of my writing. Continue reading