Tag Archives: worldbuilding

Practical Prompt 3-18-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Whether you’re writing a historical novel or contemporary fiction, getting the facts right adds depth and authenticity to your writing. Take some time to research the place and time period for your story’s setting. A few well-placed details can take your story to a whole new level.

A worldbuilder’s starter kit . . .

Alicia Finney

Alicia Finney

So, at this moment, I’m in the pre-writing phase for a project. For me, that means worldbuilding with a healthy serving of rough outlining to come. Anyway, while I’m still in the head-space for it, I thought I’d drop a few gems of wisdom on world creation. (Okay. The gems may turn out to be coal, but even that could potentially help you light some fires, right?) So. A few pointers. Continue reading

Don’t put the cart before the chull . . .

Alicia Finney

Alicia Finney

So, let’s talk world-building. Now, there’s a measure of this in every book. It’s setting, mood, timing, tone, and, most importantly, it’s where you lay the ground rules of what’s possible and what’s not in your book. You will tend to find the greatest degree of this world-building phenomena in genres like sci-fi and fantasy, especially of the epic variety. But how is it done? Where do you start? Continue reading

Of Erastide and other imaginary holidays . . .

Alicia Finney

Alicia Finney

In David Eddings’ Belgariad series there is a scene early on where the characters are celebrating a fantastical holiday called Erastide. It is the celebration of the day the seven gods created the world and the peoples. A time of togetherness, of feasting, and of remembering, it is given the same reverence in his world that we afford Christmas in ours. As a function of story, Eddings uses the scene to introduce some of the basic aspects of the world, i.e., the seven deities of their pantheon along with their personas and the people group that worships each god. It is a simple and effective use of a worldbuilding aspect that often goes overlooked. Continue reading