Tag Archives: revision

A Season of Celebration

Megan Norris Jones

Megan Norris Jones

Back in September, I won an award at our regional SCBWI conference. It was a huge encouragement to know that a professional editor enjoyed my writing enough to want more of it. The problem? I wasn’t finished with the manuscript. I’d written an extremely rough first draft wherein a number of my story elements changed from beginning to end of my manuscript. As a result, you started by reading one novel and ended by reading another. My goal had been to just get from beginning to end, and I managed that, but it needed a serious rewrite to even be coherent, never mind good. So, I have been slogging away at that rewrite for . . . well, let’s just say it’s been a while. Continue reading

On demolition and darlings . . .

Alicia Finney

Alicia Finney

Every writer has heard the advice about killing your darlings.  How important it is to know when to let go, be it an idea or a beautiful passage of prose, a turn of phrase.  There is a maturity in sacrificing a small jewel in a project for the betterment of the story itself.  But let’s face it.  It hurts.  Like re-breaking a misaligned bone so that it can be re-set.  You are clearing something good to make way for something amazing.

I recently heard a somewhat extreme version of the killing your darlings concept.  It’s for those that are caught in a quagmire and cannot seem to move forward, or just those daredevils that want to see what other options might be out there.  The concept is this.  Take your best idea, or a couple of your best ideas, and throw it out.  Then dive back into the project and see what shakes loose. Continue reading

Short and to the Point

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

People who know me would describe me as a talker. I can log two minutes on my husband’s voice mail just to ask him to pick up milk. What can I say? I like back stories and context. I’m wordy. Yet, my writer friends would hesitate to describe my writing as “wordy.” I’m known as the one who uses sparse description and concise transitions. After years of crafting newspaper and magazine articles that needed to fit a set word count, the to-the-point journalist in me is hard to shake. Until recently, I didn’t realize other writers admire the ability to write lean. So I thought I would share how I’ve fine-tuned that skill over my career. Continue reading

Insomniacs Anonymous 12-25-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

Do the characters in your story reflect aspects of your own family and traditions? If so, how does this reflection enhance your story? What might you need to revise in order to serve the story you are telling?

Show ’em how it’s done

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

I was nervous about writing my blog post for today about the Writing 101 rule of “show, don’t tell.” My fingers hovered over the keyboard as I considered what I wanted to share with our readers about the tricky topic. I tapped out some words, paused, read them, read them again, and jabbed at the delete button until they disappeared from the screen. I repeated this process several times before finally deciding to keep what you’re reading right now. Continue reading