Tag Archives: research

Practical Prompt 3-30-16: Fight Scenes Part 3

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

For our March “Learn to Write by Reading” challenge, we invited you to examine books in which the authors did a great job writing fight scenes.

Now, apply what you learned to your own manuscript. Make sure the tone of your fight scene matches the tone of your story. A slap-stick fight scene with witty dialogue and pratfalls may be perfect for a comedy, but totally out of place in a gritty drama.

Practical Prompt 3-23-16: Fight Scenes Part 2

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

For our March “Learn to Write by Reading” challenge, we invited you to examine books in which the authors did a great job writing fight scenes.

Now, apply what you learned to your own manuscript. After blocking in your fight scene add in the emotion. What are your characters feeling as the fight progresses? Fear? Excitement? Anger? Now convey those emotions with body language and dialogue.

Learn to Write by Reading: Fight Scenes

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

Successful writers say it all the time: To be a good writer, you need to be a good reader. So we challenge you to read more and to read outside of your comfort zone.

This month, read a book that includes riveting fight scenes that keep the reader engaged until the scene ends. Below are some books we recommend, but feel free to chime in and offer other options to our readers. Then stay tuned for some practical prompts based on our Reading Challenge that you can apply to your own writing.

Alicia – Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson
Laura – Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows by J. K. Rowling
Megan – Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers
Stacey – A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

Show ’em how it’s done

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

I was nervous about writing my blog post for today about the Writing 101 rule of “show, don’t tell.” My fingers hovered over the keyboard as I considered what I wanted to share with our readers about the tricky topic. I tapped out some words, paused, read them, read them again, and jabbed at the delete button until they disappeared from the screen. I repeated this process several times before finally deciding to keep what you’re reading right now. Continue reading

Insomniacs Anonymous 10-14-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

In researching information for a book, where do you find your sources? Online? The library? Personal experiences? Expert interviews?