Insomniacs Anonymous 6-9-17

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

What new release are you most looking forward to reading this summer?

Practical Prompt 6-7-17

WriteOwls logo 150 blackYou finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

If you’re foundering in your story’s second act, the problem could be you’re not as sure of your story’s direction as you thought you were. Try skipping the middle and write the climax first. Once you have a firm beginning and end, it’s easier to see the path you’ll need to take your characters down to prepare them for the end.

The Rest of Life

Megan Norris Jones

I heard Kate DiCamillo speak at a book festival last year, and she described getting a job at a warehouse when she first got serious about writing. The job gave her time to write, but it also gave her the mental space to write. She spent her work day using her body and then her writing day using her mind. It created a balanced life.

That kind of balance is hard to come by, but it’s vital for a writer to produce good work. And it’s a concept I’ve been learning the hard way. Continue reading

Insomniacs Anonymous 6-2-17

You’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

You might not be in school anymore, but do you make your own summer reading lists?

Practical Prompt 5-31-17

WriteOwls logo 150 blackYou finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Making things bad for your character is good, but adversity that doesn’t push the plot can exhaust—and then bore—your reader. Look over the bad breaks you’ve given your characters and make sure that each is necessary and drives them further along in the story. Cut any that don’t move the plot.