Category Archives: Practical Prompts

Practical Prompt 3-21-18

Think about the last book you set down before you reached the end. Perhaps the faults that bother you the most are the ones that hit too close to home. With that in mind, revisit that book and see if you can find where you lost interest. Then compare it to your own manuscript to see if you are having similar issues.

Practical Prompt 3-14-18

Before you sit down to write your scene, list the characters in the scene and write out their individual goals. Even if you never state those motivations in the prose, knowing them will help you write more authentic character interactions and add complexity and richness to your story.

Practical Prompt 3-7-18

Make the most of the time you have to write by using your pre-writing downtime wisely. Are there character backstories that need fleshing out? Plot points that aren’t fully formed in your mind? In between your writing sessions, make a list of the details in your story that need attention. Then, when you find yourself commuting, walking the dog or folding laundry, work through the list in your head. By the time you’re ready to sit down to write, you’ll have the details fresh in your mind to get them onto the page.

Practical Prompt 1-24-18

Knowing when you have time to write is the first step to establishing a consistent writing habit. Over the next week, analyze your routine to figure out how long you can commit to writing each day during February’s Write by Midnight challenge. Look for pockets of time to write, even if they aren’t at the same time each day. Or, see where you can add minutes to your daily writing schedule if you’re already in a good habit.

Practical Prompt 1-17-18

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now.

The clock is ticking, people. Start writing. If you’re like most writers, you always have story ideas stewing in the back of your mind. So how do you decide which one is worthy of your time? Consider what’s currently on the market as part of your decision-making process. Think about what’s overdone and what’s up and coming. Research “wish lists” from agents and editors to shed some light on what’s in demand. Start with the ideas you’re most excited about that also fit that bill.