Author Archives: stacey kite

Writing Strategy Number 10,001?

Stacey Kite

Thomas Edison said, “I’ve not failed, I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Or maybe it was Wile E. Coyote. I get the two confused. Anyway, my point is that whether you call something a success or failure depends on how you choose to look at it.

With that in mind, I’m choosing to call my first attempt at NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) a success—because I’ve learned that it’s not for me. Continue reading

I Need Caffeine!

Stacey Kite

Tea, tea, where the *#*%* did I leave my stupid tea?

It’s NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), and I need caffeine!

That’s my new, morning (and by morning, I mean 4:00 am) mantra.

You see, last Wednesday, November 1 (that’s important), I was complaining to a writing friend (Megan) that my biggest writing issue is that I’m a slow writer, and by slow, I mean geologic, not sloth-like. Continue reading

Exposition Exploration: Part 2

Stacey Kite

How many times have you said, “The book was OK, but the movie was fantastic”?

Me neither.

Common knowledge says the difference is because movies have to trim the plot and cut scenes to fit the story into a shorter format. That’s part of the reason, but I think there’s another, subtler and far more important ingredient lost in the translation—the telling. With the exception of voice-overs, movies are all show and no tell. Books, on the other hand, have loads of telling. Continue reading

Exposition Exploration: Part 1?

Stacey Kite

I thought this was going to be a simple research and post project. Oops—wrong again.

First off, let me give you some background. I have had a problem with getting through transitions and summaries in my writing. Not every time. But when my writing snags it’s usually not on character actions, reactions, scene description, dialogue or the step-by-step illustration of a scene. It’s on the narrative asides, the summaries and the stuff between scenes. What I think of as the non-scene writing. Continue reading

Snagging on Summarizing

Stacey Kite

There are lots of places in a book where the reader needs some detail but not a lot:

  • When one character has to explain something to another character that the reader already knows.
  • When characters travel from one place to another, but nothing key to the plot happens during the journey itself.
  • When significant time passes between the end of one scene and the beginning of the next.
  • When transitioning from one important sequence within a scene to the next key sequence.

In those cases—and a lot of others—writers summarize. Maybe summarize isn’t the correct literary term, maybe it’s telling when showing would be a waste of time. Either way, it’s something I struggle with. Continue reading