Tag Archives: writing routines

Getting Back to Writing

Megan Norris Jones

Habits are excruciating to make and oh-so-easy to break—especially the habit of writing. Most of us have been through one type of upheaval or another during the past 15 months that have thrown even long-established life habits out the window. For me, the most recent disturbance to my writing routine wasn’t the result of the pandemic, but the happier and more exciting process of moving house.

It was an in-town move. We found a house we loved in a ridiculously convenient location. It even has a writing room in it—one small enough that there’s no room for anyone else to intrude with toys or paperwork because there’s just enough space for my desk and a beautiful bay window overlooking the back yard. Visions of all the books I would write in that room burst across my vision the first time I laid eyes on it. This room was one of the major selling point of the house. But before I could start writing in my lovely little writing room, I had to, you know, pack and move all my worldly goods from one house to another. And then unpack them all and figure out how to organize everything in our new space. 

The house itself is a dream, but moving—as ever—is closer to nightmare. Why do I have all this stuff? More importantly, why do my family members have all that stuff? My stuff is obviously important. Of course I need the couple hundred boxes of books we hauled over from the old house. But surely somebody else could do without something else to make this process a little faster? Anybody? No? Yeah, that’s what I thought.

And so for the past couple of months, time I would normally have devoted to writing has been devoted instead to the sorting, packing, moving, and unpacking of stuff. We are currently sleeping, eating, and generally functioning in the new house. But every single room has boxes in the corner. Or in the middle of the floor. This process will go on for some time. If you know the time limit on the excuse—don’t mind the boxes; we just moved!—please let me know, because I will be pushing very hard and possibly leaping past that limit. 

But what I can’t do is continue devoting all my time to unpacking. I am still a writer, so I still must write. I knew this when I stopped writing to pack, and so I made a plan. I work best with goals and deadlines, so I took a look at my summer and found an occasion when I knew I would be free of all other obligations for several hours in a row. Then I marked the time down on my calendar as my get-back-to-writing date. I will continue unpacking, organizing, and arranging my house for the foreseeable future, but that task will not be allowed to usurp my writing time past June 12. Because on June 12, I go back to writing.

So, how about you? I know you’ve had writing routine upheaval at some point. How did you manage it and get back to your story? If you’re still struggling with that issue, try pinpointing a date on your calendar as go time. Then tell a writing partner, friend, or family member about the goal you’ve set. Getting back to normal won’t just happen. We have to work for it.

Write By Midnight Pep Talk 5-31-21

The pandemic challenged us in ways none of us could have anticipated, including how and where we write. Since we ended Write by Midnight, each of the Write Owls have received their COVID-19 vaccines and the communities we live in are seeing businesses opening their doors again. After writing from home for more than a year, often with little humans and spouses around more than they usually are, we’re ready to venture out to libraries, book stores and cafes to get our writing done in new spaces. Are you ready for a change of scenery too? Are you in a position to get back to a writing routine that reflects your pre-pandemic life? If so, now’s the time to reassess your goals, set new ones and create a new routine.

Evolution of a Home-Based Writer

Laura Ayo

This past year has challenged everyone to get creative when it comes to managing their lives from home. As someone who has juggled a home-based writing career while mothering two kids for 15 years, even I have had to adapt. But successfully working from home, especially if you share that home with other humans, is an evolving process, even when there isn’t a global pandemic adding stress and obstacles to the mix. It always requires commitment, organization, the ability to set boundaries and priorities, and flexibility. Here are my tips to making the best of it.

Commitment. The first thing I did when I started working from home was remind myself that writing is my job. It’s not a hobby. I earn income as a writer, pay taxes on that income and have a separate bank account for expenses related to writing. But it’s a very different kind of writing than the creative writing I’m doing to become a published author of books for children and teens. No one is paying me right now to do that kind of writing, but I believe it’s just as worthwhile. I committed to finishing a manuscript and now I’m committed to revising it so it’s the best I can make it. I’m committed to improving my skills and developing my craft. My creative writing time is valuable and precious and I recognize that I’ll only accomplish my goals by continuing to treat it that way.

Organization. My freelance writing work is unpredictable. I may have no assignments one day and multiple assignments the next. To best manage my time, I sit down each Sunday with the calendar on my phone to plan the upcoming week. Then, based on what I know I have on my plate, I write out a schedule for what I need to do each day. I’m a detail-oriented person, so my schedule is subdivided into half-hour increments and includes time for freelance work, creative writing, non-writing-related appointments, 15-minute breaks, a lunch hour (or half-hour on really busy days) and every-day tasks such as walking the dog, preparing dinner and, before my kids could drive, taking my kids to school and their extra-curricular activities. I review and update the schedule each night to reflect any changes that may pop up on any given day that will affect the rest of the week. Having something on paper that I can review quickly each morning keeps me focused and productive, especially when I’m juggling multiple projects for several clients that may all be due the same week. I’ve tried other tools to organize my time, but the old-fashioned paper method works best for me, although I do use my phone for appointment reminders and timer features to stay on track.

Setting Boundaries and Priorities. This part of my writing process has been the most challenged during the pandemic. Pre-COVID, I rarely had trouble setting boundaries or priorities. When my kids were infants and toddlers, their well-being and healthy development were unapologetically prioritized over my writing time. Once they started kindergarten, I only worked while they were in school or while my husband was home to take care of dinner and bedtime routines. But at the beginning of the pandemic, I found myself in unchartered waters. My husband and both kids weren’t just home; they were home with no obligations. My husband’s job shut down and the schools closed, but I still had freelance assignments coming in. For the first time, I had to be firm with setting boundaries. (I know you don’t have school tomorrow, but you can’t stay up until 3 a.m. playing video games and FaceTiming your friends because I still have to work tomorrow. I know you want me to come on a bike ride with you because, yes, the weather is gorgeous, but I have a deadline to meet.) I also had to prioritize tasks based on deadlines. I would focus on accomplishing the tasks that had firm deadlines first and made my peace with the fact that other tasks sometimes just had to be left for another day. Which brings me to my last tip…

Flexibility. Even with the best intentions and scheduled plans, life happens. Kids get sick. Storms knock out power. The meeting you thought would only last 30 minutes stretches into two hours. Global pandemics, as we now know, can happen. Being flexible when the unexpected happens is the only way to survive working from home. If you’re organized and know how to prioritize, re-working a schedule to still meet a deadline is possible. But sometimes you just have to remember that tomorrow is another day. In those moments, it’s okay to dig into a pint of ice cream or go for a walk or play with your kids. It’s important to remember you’re human, and we all need to remember to give ourselves a little grace from time to time.

Closing Out Write by Midnight: How We Fared

Congratulations on finishing Write by Midnight 2021! We hope you established some solid routines that will carry your daily writing habit well into the rest of the year and beyond. We’d love to hear from you about how you did. Did you accomplish everything you set out to do? What practices or techniques helped you meet your goals? What distracted you from reaching them and how did you alter your routine to help you overcome those challenges? It always inspires us to hear how other writers work. In that same spirit, here’s how each of us fared during this year’s write-a-thon.

How Laura Fared

Laura Ayo

Yesterday, I read a tweet encouraging writers not to have high expectations for themselves when it came to setting goals for daily output. Why set the bar high and fail to get over it when you can aim low and surely succeed? I feel certain there are people who agree with the author’s reasoning, but I’m not one of them. To me, the point of setting goals is to push yourself to see what you’re capable of achieving if you work hard and remain open to learning. For this year’s Write by Midnight, I set big goals, vowing to write daily for more time than I usually do with the intention of revising eight chapters of my work-in-progress. I’m pleased to report that I wrote for my designated 90 minutes all but three of those days and logged more than 10,000 brand new words. While I only revised five of the eight chapters I challenged myself to revise in 28 days, the ones I finished are better now than when I started with them. I wrote entire scenes only to delete them later because I found more compelling ones waiting to be written. Most important, I’m discovering my voice as a writer through the process. Moving forward, I’ll keep sitting down each morning to write and I’ll keep revising scenes and writing new ones. Publishing my first novel is a big goal I have for myself, and I’m fired up to crush it.

How Stacey Fared

Stacey Kite

In November and December I made steady progress revising my manuscript and felt really good about my writing. Though I lost momentum in January, I figured I could turn things around during Write by Midnight if I pushed a little harder.

For the first two weeks of February, though, my writing stalled. I could not move past one scene. Every morning I would write and delete, write and delete for two hours or so, always feeling like I was just on the cusp of getting it right, but then didn’t. Usually, when my writing sputters to a halt like that, I can look back over the chapter I’ve been working on and, after some critical study, point my finger at a culprit—a plot flaw or character inconsistency that’s giving my subconscious fits, or a segue that turns the narrative down a dead end. But this time, I couldn’t spot the problem with the story and decided the problem might be with me. Maybe, my brain just needed a little writing vacation.

So, instead of beating my head on my keyboard, I decided to take the third week of February off and indulge in some non-writing activities in the hopes of recharging my creative well. I spent days drooling over plant catalogs, thinking about raised garden beds—clearly, I have a terrible case of spring fever—and making preliminary sketches for new paintings and sculptures.

Though I’d originally planned to dive back into my manuscript for the last week of WBM and try to finish the write-a-thon strong, the universe threw me a curve ball when someone stole our car. At that point, I just gave up on February.

But yesterday was a beautiful day. The sun was shining, the temperature was balmy, twenty six of the thirty echinacea seeds I’d planted sprouted, the dog had a great time on the beach and I booked my husband’s first COVID-19 vaccination.

I see a light at the end of the tunnel, and that makes me think that, despite all the crazy in the world right now, March may be a better writing month.

How Megan Fared

Megan Norris Jones

The month of February did not go exactly as planned for me. I made excellent progress during the first half of the month and even worked through a significant world building concept that made my entire outline much stronger. However, the middle of February brought with it such snow and ice as my part of the country rarely sees. Since we don’t have the equipment or infrastructure to deal with that kind of winter weather, everything just shut down—including schools—and I spent a full week of Write by Midnight stuck at home with my restless family. I know the pandemic has marooned many of you in that same situation for a year now. I salute you, my fellow writers, because writing with children underfoot is hard. My situation was temporary, so I just bailed. No writing at all for the week of snow and little for the week of recovery that has followed. It was not a stellar showing for me. However, March is looking up. I think. Surely we won’t have another snowstorm. Or flood. Tornadoes? There’s still that pesky pandemic … Nope. I definitely have to get writing. The world won’t survive without a little fiction to escape into.  

Be sure to check back in with us for our monthly Write by Midnight Pep Talks. Together, we can help each other achieve our writing dreams.

Write by Midnight Pep Talk 1-25-21

It’s hard to believe 2021 marks our 5th year of hosting the Write by Midnight daily writing challenge. This year’s write-a-thon starts a week from today! For those of you new to our blog, we challenge ourselves and our readers to commit to writing every day – by midnight – in the month of February. Are you up to the task? Spend this week preparing so you’re ready to hit the ground writing on Feb. 1. Links to past blog posts, writing prompts, tips, a goal-tracking log and inspiration can be found on our Write by Midnight page. 2020 wasn’t the year we expected it to be, but now that we’ve adapted, let Write by Midnight be the springboard you need to get back into the habit of writing every day.