Tag Archives: POV

Learning the Lingo

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

If you’re a swimmer, you know you swim fly, back, breast and free in that order in the IM. If you know nothing about swimming, you are likely feeling like a foreigner in a country where everyone but you speaks the same language. It’s an uncomfortable, frustrating position to be in. Yet, every hobby and sport has its own lingo, just as every profession, including writing, does. I was reminded of this fact last week while talking with some writer friends. I used the acronym WIP during our conversation and one of the women interrupted me to ask what it meant. “Work in progress,” another answered. Since then, I’ve been thinking about how much there is to learn when it comes to writing terminology. Continue reading

Organizing the Headache: Tips for Writing a Multi-POV Novel

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

When I first began my novel, I wrote scenes and jotted down notes as they came to me, no rhyme or reason as I’ve noted before. And while this freestyle writing habit birthed some very creative ideas, I often found contradictions in plot lines and would have to spend time fixing and readjusting the whole story. This stole time from plowing ahead on my first draft.

After Stacey raved about John Truby’s book, The Anatomy of Story, I took a step back and did what “normal” writers probably do: I organized and planned. Continue reading

Stories Worth Telling

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

Whenever I prepare to talk to kids, regardless of the subject, I think about what they’ll find interesting. I consider what will grab their attention and hold it beyond five minutes – much like a writer must captivate readers from the very first page of a novel and keep them turning the pages. So when I spoke to three 5th grade classes about my career as a journalist and writer a few months ago, I didn’t start talking to them about why I became a writer or what I love about my job. I began by asking how many of them had ever been to Disney World. Continue reading

Multi-POV, With a Side of Headache? Yes, Please.

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Ah, here I am again staring into the eyes of Multiperspectivity. I have become a pretty big fan of that term: Multiperspectivity, aka. Polyperspectivity, aka. Multi-POV. It’s a fun word, a big word, a word that is difficult to pronounce. Try saying that three times!

After  reading several fantastic novels that used a Multi-POV narrative, I initially felt inspired and ready to conquer the beast that is a Multi-POV Continue reading

Novel Structure and Multi-POVs

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Awhile back I started to create reading lists for myself as a fun way to start each season. Often I strive to select books across genres, some for the sake of being a children’s and YA (aspiring) author, others to keep up the ruse of being a good post-grad “intellectual” and other for the sheer pleasure of just reading something I want to read. It’s good to be well-rounded in your reading habits, and I stand by the belief that in order to become good writers, it is necessary to read—comic books included. Continue reading

Practical Prompt 9-11-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Switch the POV in your scene from first person to third (or vice versa) and see how it changes the flow.

My Name Is …

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

I’m currently working on a YA novel with a 16-year-old female protagonist. The story is told from her point of view, and I’ve been struggling with something that should be simple: how to let my readers know her name. It feels forced no matter how I try to do it. So I went to my bookshelf and started reading to see how other authors have handled the matter. I also paid attention to when these authors introduce their protagonists’ names. In my completely unscientific and limited research, I noticed some trends, which I’ve done my best to outline here. Continue reading

Practical Prompt 4-24-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Prompt: Reconsider your protagonist. Why are you telling the story of your particular protagonist? Rewrite a scene from the viewpoint of a secondary character—or rewrite it multiple times from a different viewpoint each time. Are any of the other characters in a better position to tell your story?

Resource: Narrative Viewpoint

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

While banging my head against the wall considering my narrative options for one of my characters, I happened upon a wonderful and concise explanation for POV: Narrative Viewpoint, posted on Grossmont College’s website. There, I found a guide breaking down the various modes of Narrative Viewpoint, or POV – something that James Phelan’s book, Narrative as Rhetoric: Technique, Audiences, Ethics, Ideology, also does remarkably well if you have the time to read it. Continue reading