Tag Archives: writer’s block

Snagging on Summarizing

Stacey Kite

There are lots of places in a book where the reader needs some detail but not a lot:

  • When one character has to explain something to another character that the reader already knows.
  • When characters travel from one place to another, but nothing key to the plot happens during the journey itself.
  • When significant time passes between the end of one scene and the beginning of the next.
  • When transitioning from one important sequence within a scene to the next key sequence.

In those cases—and a lot of others—writers summarize. Maybe summarize isn’t the correct literary term, maybe it’s telling when showing would be a waste of time. Either way, it’s something I struggle with. Continue reading

Practical Prompt 8-2-17

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

If you’re struggling with a scene and writing in the third person, try writing from a first person perspective or vice versa. That change in perspective may be enough to get you going.

Avoiding Difficult Scenes Doth Not a Writer Make

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

I have a confession.

I dance around the scenes I don’t want to write. Or at least don’t feel equipped to.

Currently, there are three big gaping holes in my manuscript. All three holes should be filled with essential scenes; all three are insanely difficult for me to write. There are scenes before and scenes Continue reading

Practical Prompt 5-03-17

WriteOwls logo 150 blackYou finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

If you’re struggling to get words on the page, using a timer may help. In your next writing session, set an alarm for the first half of your allotted writing time. If you only have 30 minutes to write, set the alarm for 15 minutes and write, racing the clock. Avoid deleting, backspacing or reconsidering during this 15-minute segment. The goal is word count. When the alarm goes off, use the last half of your writing time to polish and flesh out what you wrote under the gun.

Practical Prompt 4-5-17

WriteOwls logo 150 blackYou finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

If you’re having trouble starting a scene, try writing it from the middle. If you’re struggling to figure out what constitutes “the middle,” pick up the scene mid-conflict. After you’ve written the bulk of the scene, you may realize a beginning wasn’t even needed. Or, you may find that the beginning will become apparent to you as you’re completing the exercise.