Tag Archives: research

Learning the Lingo

Laura Ayo

Laura Ayo

If you’re a swimmer, you know you swim fly, back, breast and free in that order in the IM. If you know nothing about swimming, you are likely feeling like a foreigner in a country where everyone but you speaks the same language. It’s an uncomfortable, frustrating position to be in. Yet, every hobby and sport has its own lingo, just as every profession, including writing, does. I was reminded of this fact last week while talking with some writer friends. I used the acronym WIP during our conversation and one of the women interrupted me to ask what it meant. “Work in progress,” another answered. Since then, I’ve been thinking about how much there is to learn when it comes to writing terminology. Continue reading

Voracious Readers, Take Note

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

I’ve heard of writers taking a reading day–a designated day where they just read. An idea I’ve grown rather fond of. So much so that I think I’ve spent more time reading than I have writing. My weekly reading day, has transpired into reading days, and very little writing is getting done.

I am certain that it is good to read books that will aid us in various areas of our writing, so as I continue to make my way through my reading goals for 2016, I am choosing to revert to my grad school days to make my reading meaningful and intentional. Rather than just reading for fun, I am now using this time to populate my books with notes on post-its of things the author is doing that will aid me as a writer. Be it story structure, an unorthodox way of solving a problem, a way of developing a character, etc. Continue reading

Practical Prompt 3-30-16: Fight Scenes Part 3

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

For our March “Learn to Write by Reading” challenge, we invited you to examine books in which the authors did a great job writing fight scenes.

Now, apply what you learned to your own manuscript. Make sure the tone of your fight scene matches the tone of your story. A slap-stick fight scene with witty dialogue and pratfalls may be perfect for a comedy, but totally out of place in a gritty drama.

Practical Prompt 3-23-16: Fight Scenes Part 2

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

For our March “Learn to Write by Reading” challenge, we invited you to examine books in which the authors did a great job writing fight scenes.

Now, apply what you learned to your own manuscript. After blocking in your fight scene add in the emotion. What are your characters feeling as the fight progresses? Fear? Excitement? Anger? Now convey those emotions with body language and dialogue.

Learn to Write by Reading: Fight Scenes

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

Successful writers say it all the time: To be a good writer, you need to be a good reader. So we challenge you to read more and to read outside of your comfort zone.

This month, read a book that includes riveting fight scenes that keep the reader engaged until the scene ends. Below are some books we recommend, but feel free to chime in and offer other options to our readers. Then stay tuned for some practical prompts based on our Reading Challenge that you can apply to your own writing.

Alicia – Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson
Laura – Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows by J. K. Rowling
Megan – Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers
Stacey – A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin