Tag Archives: clichés

In the Name of Love

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

While I’ve been test driving the theory that clutter aids creativty (more on that in a few weeks), I’ve been struggling with the need for romance between two of my characters. Seems fitting that at the same time we ushered the new reading challenge–the first theme being attraction– that I would also be struggling with how to create attraction in an authentic way. Continue reading

Practical Prompt 2-18-15

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

If you have “love at first sight” in your storyline, make sure the relationship still develops at an even pace. Taking things slow can be romantic and build tension. Going too fast can come off as creepy instead of romantic.

Practical Prompt 6-5-14

WriteOwls

WriteOwls

You finally have a moment to write, but what to do with your limited time? Here’s a practical prompt to kickstart the story you’re working on right now. The clock is ticking, people. Start writing.

Prompt: Take a few moments to consider your novel’s genre. Is it a mystery? A romance? Contemporary realism? Paranormal? What are the standard elements usually included in the genre? For example, a romance generally includes the protagonist, a love interest, and a rival for the protagonist’s affections. A mystery has a central unexplained event, clues, red herrings, and the eventual reveal. How can you use these common elements for uncommon effect in your own story? Look for a way to turn convention on its head, add an unexpected twist, or use the readers’ expectations against them. Understanding the accepted formulas and then manipulating them for your own designs will raise the level of your story.

Clichés and Common Fallacies

Stacey Kite

Stacey Kite

As a writer, I don’t want to put phrases or factual errors in my story that could throw a reader off. As a reader, two big things that do that to me are clichés and frequently used scenarios that have become common-place in storytelling, but are just plain wrong. In the interest of avoiding those pitfalls, I’m compiling a list of clichés and common fallacies. Obviously, the ones I’m listing here bother me because of my specific background, but there are certainly scads I’m not conscious of. Continue reading