Tag Archives: book recommendations

Insomniacs Anonymous 4-21-17

WriteOwls logo 150 blackYou’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

What is the best book you’ve read in the last three months?

Insomniacs Anonymous 3-24-17

WriteOwls logo 150 blackYou’re awake. Instead of writing the Great American Novel—or even a mediocre one—you’re reading our blog. Okay, then. We offer a topic; you respond. Let your fellow writers inspire you, and return to that manuscript refreshed.

What’s your favorite book on writing?

Books for Improving Your Craft

Megan Norris Jones

Megan Norris Jones

I’ve been reading a number of books on writing lately, so I’d like to share a few recommendations with you.

1. The Scene Book by Sandra Scofield.
Most of the books on writing that I have devoured over the years have looked at putting together an entire novel, but this book drills down to the level of the individual scene and delves into what makes these building blocks of a novel work. It’s a thoughtful and insightful guide to this aspect of storytelling, and I learned a lot in the process of reading it that I’m looking forward to incorporating into my own writing.

2. Novel Metamorphosis by Darcy Pattison.
Pattison taught an intensive course on revision at the conference I attended in September, but I couldn’t get up there a day early to attend it, so my sweet husband bought me the book as a consolation prize. It’s as much a workbook as an instruction manual, so wait on this one till you have a finished draft in hand. I already have a running list of things that need to be improved in the next draft of my manuscript, but digging into Pattison’s perspective on revision gave me a solid approach to the process.

3. Self-Editing for Fiction Writers by Renni Browne and Dave King.
Written by two editors, this book gives great advice on improving your own writing that can take it from mediocre to exceptional. My favorite aspect was that most examples came from manuscripts the authors had actually edited, so I could see how to apply the advice in real life. A passage that sounded just fine to me would be taken to the next level with their editing techniques.

What books have you found most helpful in developing your craft?

Happy Love Day!

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Naomi Hawkins-Rowe

Ah, Valentines day. It’s the day cupid supposedly shoots his arrow and we all find love. It’s a day when everyone has a decent excuse for a massive sugar high. It’s a day when all you need is love.

Don’t worry, I’m not going to get all lovey-lovey on you. At least not in the way you might expect. This post is for the love of books and the various types of love we find in them.

Here at WriteOwls, we are big believers in learning the craft of writing from other authors. If you’ve read our series Learn to Write by Reading, then you know we love to recommend books that have influenced us, or helped us become better writers.

For me the following books have had a profound effect on me in this regard:

Kids of Appetite, aka KOA (some romance, but it’s more about the love between the family you create)

The Serpent King (like KOA, some romance, but more about how deeply true friends can love each other while riding out the most unpleasant aspects of life)

Cloud Atlas (Love that transcends more than one lifetime)

The Cather in the Rye (Holden’s love for his sister and his desire to protect her from going over the edge is classic)

The Red Pencil (love that propels a family to survive)

5to1 (gradually learning to love someone and then allowing them to go on)

On Beauty (0ne of the complex love stories I’ve read in a long time)

Barkskins ( more a love note to a place rather than the people who inhabit it)

I could literally (haha) list 600 more books, but I won’t because I should be writing. (If you have an other recommendations, please share!)

Now it’s your turn. Think of all the books you’ve read where love, and not just romantic love, was illustrated so wonderfully. Think about the way the author effectively showed the love between characters (again, not necessarily romantic). Today, while you write, see if you can apply that to your own writing.

 

 

Learn to Write by Reading: Character Arc

WriteOwls logo 150 blackSuccessful writers say it all the time: To be a good writer, you need to be a good reader. So we challenge you to read more and to read outside of your comfort zone.

Good novels aren’t just about what happens (plot). They’re about how people respond to what’s happening, and how their beliefs change over the course of a story (character arc). In this month’s challenge, we invite you to read books where the authors did a wonderful job of shifting the character’s worldview over the course of the story. Here are some of our book recommendations. Pay particular attention to the growth of the characters over the course of the story.

Alicia: The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer
Laura: Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg
Megan: Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo
Naomi: The Red Pencil by Andrea Davis Pinkney
Stacey: Small Gods by Terry Pratchett